YOUTH IN ASIA
YOUTH IN ASIA
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comicsinfinity:

Chernobyl beckons Lara and her friends as they attempt to uncover the truth in Tomb Raider #8! Preorder it here: http://ow.ly/yEviV
Album Art
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Gerd Ludwig’s The Long Shadow of Chernobyl

Los Angeles-based photographer Gerd Ludwig has been going back to Chernobyl, site of the 1986 nuclear explosion in Ukraine, for the past 20 years to document the severe and long-lasting impact it has had on the people and places inside the exclusion zone up till today. He first visited the city in 1993 on a National Geographic assignment, when access was highly restricted, and back again in 2005, where he was allowed only 15 minutes in Reactor No.4, due to the deadly levels of pollution. He described the experience, “I knew that I had less than 15 minutes to capture impacting images of an environment that few have ever seen and that I might never access again. The adrenaline surge was extraordinary.” Even though it is highly dangerous, the photographer does it out of responsibility to those who continue to suffer the impacts of the disaster.
Gerd Ludwig’s The Long Shadow of Chernobyl

Los Angeles-based photographer Gerd Ludwig has been going back to Chernobyl, site of the 1986 nuclear explosion in Ukraine, for the past 20 years to document the severe and long-lasting impact it has had on the people and places inside the exclusion zone up till today. He first visited the city in 1993 on a National Geographic assignment, when access was highly restricted, and back again in 2005, where he was allowed only 15 minutes in Reactor No.4, due to the deadly levels of pollution. He described the experience, “I knew that I had less than 15 minutes to capture impacting images of an environment that few have ever seen and that I might never access again. The adrenaline surge was extraordinary.” Even though it is highly dangerous, the photographer does it out of responsibility to those who continue to suffer the impacts of the disaster.
Gerd Ludwig’s The Long Shadow of Chernobyl

Los Angeles-based photographer Gerd Ludwig has been going back to Chernobyl, site of the 1986 nuclear explosion in Ukraine, for the past 20 years to document the severe and long-lasting impact it has had on the people and places inside the exclusion zone up till today. He first visited the city in 1993 on a National Geographic assignment, when access was highly restricted, and back again in 2005, where he was allowed only 15 minutes in Reactor No.4, due to the deadly levels of pollution. He described the experience, “I knew that I had less than 15 minutes to capture impacting images of an environment that few have ever seen and that I might never access again. The adrenaline surge was extraordinary.” Even though it is highly dangerous, the photographer does it out of responsibility to those who continue to suffer the impacts of the disaster.
Gerd Ludwig’s The Long Shadow of Chernobyl

Los Angeles-based photographer Gerd Ludwig has been going back to Chernobyl, site of the 1986 nuclear explosion in Ukraine, for the past 20 years to document the severe and long-lasting impact it has had on the people and places inside the exclusion zone up till today. He first visited the city in 1993 on a National Geographic assignment, when access was highly restricted, and back again in 2005, where he was allowed only 15 minutes in Reactor No.4, due to the deadly levels of pollution. He described the experience, “I knew that I had less than 15 minutes to capture impacting images of an environment that few have ever seen and that I might never access again. The adrenaline surge was extraordinary.” Even though it is highly dangerous, the photographer does it out of responsibility to those who continue to suffer the impacts of the disaster.
Gerd Ludwig’s The Long Shadow of Chernobyl

Los Angeles-based photographer Gerd Ludwig has been going back to Chernobyl, site of the 1986 nuclear explosion in Ukraine, for the past 20 years to document the severe and long-lasting impact it has had on the people and places inside the exclusion zone up till today. He first visited the city in 1993 on a National Geographic assignment, when access was highly restricted, and back again in 2005, where he was allowed only 15 minutes in Reactor No.4, due to the deadly levels of pollution. He described the experience, “I knew that I had less than 15 minutes to capture impacting images of an environment that few have ever seen and that I might never access again. The adrenaline surge was extraordinary.” Even though it is highly dangerous, the photographer does it out of responsibility to those who continue to suffer the impacts of the disaster.
Gerd Ludwig’s The Long Shadow of Chernobyl

Los Angeles-based photographer Gerd Ludwig has been going back to Chernobyl, site of the 1986 nuclear explosion in Ukraine, for the past 20 years to document the severe and long-lasting impact it has had on the people and places inside the exclusion zone up till today. He first visited the city in 1993 on a National Geographic assignment, when access was highly restricted, and back again in 2005, where he was allowed only 15 minutes in Reactor No.4, due to the deadly levels of pollution. He described the experience, “I knew that I had less than 15 minutes to capture impacting images of an environment that few have ever seen and that I might never access again. The adrenaline surge was extraordinary.” Even though it is highly dangerous, the photographer does it out of responsibility to those who continue to suffer the impacts of the disaster.
Gerd Ludwig’s The Long Shadow of Chernobyl

Los Angeles-based photographer Gerd Ludwig has been going back to Chernobyl, site of the 1986 nuclear explosion in Ukraine, for the past 20 years to document the severe and long-lasting impact it has had on the people and places inside the exclusion zone up till today. He first visited the city in 1993 on a National Geographic assignment, when access was highly restricted, and back again in 2005, where he was allowed only 15 minutes in Reactor No.4, due to the deadly levels of pollution. He described the experience, “I knew that I had less than 15 minutes to capture impacting images of an environment that few have ever seen and that I might never access again. The adrenaline surge was extraordinary.” Even though it is highly dangerous, the photographer does it out of responsibility to those who continue to suffer the impacts of the disaster.
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the final scene of "The Petrified Forest" (1936)

the final scene of "The Petrified Forest" (1936)

the final scene of "The Petrified Forest" (1936)

the final scene of "The Petrified Forest" (1936)
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"Look around you. Watch how people function and interact with one another. You’ll see this is going on everywhere all the time. People devour each other in the name of love, or family or country. But that’s an excuse; they’re just hungry and want to be fed."
 Jonathan Carroll, The Marriage of Sticks  (via thatkindofwoman)
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peterfromtexas:

Brigitte Bardot
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